BIOPHYLIA AND BIOPHYLIC DESIGN EFFECTS ON QUALITY OF LIFE

Oana Răcușan, Marcel Dîrja, Adelina Dumitraș

Abstract


In his book Biophilia (1984), Edward O. Wilson, the promoter of the concept of biophilia, defines this concept as "the desire to affiliate with other life forms," suggesting that humans tend to seek connections with nature, with other forms of life, this search being even in the subconscious and characterizing it as a genetic disposition that binds human survival to the valorization of living systems. J. Baird Callicott also argues that human feelings are naturally directed to all living systems and beings, which has evolutionary value. The foundation of this conception is found even in the ethics of Aristotle, who questions the term philia (friendship), providing a theory of interspecific obligation. The application of biophilia in interior design is a relatively new concept, but it can have a significant impact on the quality of human life. Biophilic design uses natural elements and patterns to improve the indoor environment, given that people currently spend most of their time indoors. E. Wilson believes that the implementation of biophilia in interior design benefits physically, mentally and socially, influencing well-being, productivity and social relationships.

 


Keywords


biophilia, biophilic design, nature, human-nature connection, indoor space

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15835/agrisp.v115i3-4.13973



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