Designing Innovative Crops According to the Needs of Climate Change and Green Deal

  • Stavros ARACHOVITIS School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens
  • Ioanna KAKABOUKI School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens
  • Dimitrios BILALIS School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens
  • Ioannis ROUSSIS School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens
  • Antonios MAVROEIDIS School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens
  • Anastasios ZOTOS University of Patras, 30200 Mesolonghi
  • Vassilios TRIANTAFYLLIDIS University of Patras, 30100 Agrinio
  • Evangelia TIGKA Hellenic Agricultural Organization Demeter, Institute of Industrial and Forage Crops, 41335 Larissa
Keywords: Climate change, innovative crops, retro-innovative crops, restrictive factors, sustainability

Abstract

Climate change and environmental degradation pose an actual threat to Europe and the rest of the world. Innovative or retrovative crops could be components of alternative redesigned agro-ecosystems, meeting the EU Green Deal targets for reduced use of chemical inputs by 2030. The present study aimed to evaluate: a) the adaptation of production to the stormy effects of climate change, b) the detection of the receptivity of the producers to the application of the design of innovative and retro-innovative crops in the field, and c) the in-depth detection of inhibiting factors (natural resources, economic, social and anthropogenic factors) for producers. A quantitative research was performed using structured interviews (face to face - a set of questions) and open-ended questions. The selected sample was composed of 41 farmers and the study area was the Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece. The statistical processing of the answers showed a significant correlation of change receptivity with age, educational level and the main profession. Younger people, those with higher education and non-mainstream farmers are more receptive to change and switch to innovative crops. The environment, climatic and economic, requires adaptation and change in order to maintain sustainability. Producers are receptive to reforms and shifts to innovative and retro-innovative crops. However, there is a lack of coherent policies in the direction of building infrastructure, solving structural problems, training and transferring know-how, and finally, providing incentives and opportunities by creating and utilizing the appropriate tools.

Author Biographies

Stavros ARACHOVITIS, School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens

Laboratory of Agronomy, Department of Crop Science

Ioanna KAKABOUKI, School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens

Laboratory of Agronomy, Department of Crop Science

Dimitrios BILALIS, School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens

Laboratory of Agronomy, Department of Crop Science

Ioannis ROUSSIS, School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens

Laboratory of Agronomy, Department of Crop Science

Antonios MAVROEIDIS, School of Plant Sciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos str., 118 55 Athens

Laboratory of Agronomy, Department of Crop Science

Anastasios ZOTOS, University of Patras, 30200 Mesolonghi

Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

Vassilios TRIANTAFYLLIDIS, University of Patras, 30100 Agrinio

Department of Biosystems Administration of Food and Agricultural Enterprises

Published
2023-06-21